Magnetotactic bacteria

Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) make magnetic particles so that they can navigate to specific oxygen levels within water or saturated sediment. MTB live all over the world and in a variety of habitats ranging from lakes to acid mine drainages. I began studying MTB during my undergraduate degree at the University of Rochester in 2014. My interest in these fascinating organisms brought me to the University of Utah for my PhD in 2015. For my PhD, I characterized MTB in the Great Salt Lake. Most of my modern MTB work involves field work, light microscopy, magnetic separation, transmission electron microscopy, and magnetic measurements. One of the best parts of this work, however, is the active collaboration with microbiologists specializing in MTB.


Publications

check back in a couple months!


Presentations

Wagner, C. Magnetotactic Bacteria: Journey from the Modern into the Past. Utah Friends of Paleontology monthly meeting. Invited Talk.

Wagner, C. Magnetotactic Bacteria: Using Magnetoreception to Survive Microenvironmental Disasters.  Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science meeting, October 2017. Invited Talk.          

Wagner, C., G. Patterson, T. Zhang, W. Lin, Y. Pan. The Effect of Magnetic Field Strength on Biomineralization by Magnetotactic Bacteria, and Observing Magnetotactic Bacteria Diversity Using Magnetic Measurements, NSF EAPSI Young Scientist Forum (Beijing, China), August 2017. Talk.     

Wagner, C., J. Tarduno, A. Stein, and E. Sia. Characterization of a Magnetotactic Bacterial Species from Devil’s Bathtub, Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, December 2015. Talk.

Wagner, C., J. Tarduno, A. Stein, and E. Sia. Characterization of a Single Magnetotactic Bacterial Species from Devil’s Bathtub, Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY, Undergraduate Research Exposition, University of Rochester, May 2015. Talk.

Wagner, C. and B. McIntyre. Electron Microscope Viewing of Magnetotactic Bacteria, University of Rochester, May 2015. Poster.


Please feel free

to reach out!

Contact information:

Courtney Wagner, Ph.D.

Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow

Smithsonian Institution, NMNH

courtneywagner.geo@gmail.com

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